Saskatoon: College Park 477-1959 . Millar Ave 244-4024 | Regina: 4605 Gordon Road 545-3211

Cooking

On the stove or in the oven, get perfect results for your meals every time.

  • When to Marinate

    Marination is the process of soaking foods in a seasoned, often acidic liquid before cooking. The acidic ingredients in a marinade can consist of liquids such as vinegar, citrus juices, wine or enzymatic (made with ingredients such as pineapple or papaya. Along with these liquids, a marinade often contains oils, herbs, and spices to further flavor the food items. Marinades are commonly used to flavor foods and to tenderize tougher cuts of meat like beef. Any cut of meat can be marinated to induce flavor and tenderness. Over marinating can break down the protein too much and cause it to be mushy and undesirable. Chef Ardell has posted a chart that is useful in determining the cut and length of time to marinate.

  • Beef and Lamb Cooking Temperature Chart

    Roasts, Steaks & Chops

      Rare

    120 to 125 degrees F center is bright red, pinkish toward the exterior portion

      Medium Rare

    130 to 135 degrees F center is very pink, slightly brown toward the exterior portion

      Medium

    140 to 145degrees F center is light pink, outer portion is brown

      Medium Well

    150 to 155degrees F not pink

      Well Done

    160 degrees F and above steak is uniformly brown throughout

      Ground Meat

    160 to 165 degrees F no longer pink but uniformly brown throughout

  • Poultry Cooking Temperature Chart

      Poultry (Chicken & Duck)

    165 degrees F cook until juices run clear

      Turkey

    165 degrees F juices run clear – leg moves easily

    NOTE: A 12-lb turkey can easily handle 60 to 90 minutes of resting. During that time, temperature can rise 30 degrees if not exposed to drafts.

      Stuffing

    (Cooked alone or in turkey) 165 degrees F

  • Fish and Seafood Cooking Temperature Chart

      Fish(steaks, filleted or whole)

    140 degrees F flesh is opaque, flakes easily

      Tuna, Swordfish, & Marlin

    125 degrees F cook until medium-rare (do not overcook or the meat will become dry and lose its flavor)

      Shrimp

    Medium-size, boiling 3 to 4 minutes cook until medium-rare (do not overcook or the meat will become dry and lose its flavor)
    Large-size, boiling 5 to 7 minues cook until medium-rare (do not overcook or the meat will become dry and lose its flavor)
    Jumbo-size, boiling 7 to 8 minutes cook until medium-rare (do not overcook or the meat will become dry and lose its flavor)

      Lobster

    Boiled, whole – 1 lb. 12 to 15 minutes meat turns red and opaque in center when cut
    Broiled, whole – 1 1/2 lbs. 3 to 4 minutes meat turns red and opaque in center when cut
    Steamed, whole – 1 1/2 lbs. 15 to 20 minutes meat turns red and opaque in center when cut
    Baked, tails – each 15 minutes meat turns red and opaque in center when cut
    Broiled, tails – each 9 to 10 minutes meat turns red and opaque in center when cut

      Scallops

    Bake 12 to 15 minutes milky white or opaque, and firm
    Broil milky white or opaque, and firm

      Clams, Mussels & Oysters

    point at which their shells open –
    throw away any that do not open

  • Braising

    BRAISING: A moist cooking method by which food (usually meat or vegetables) is first browned in fat, then cooked, tightly covered, in a small amount of liquid at low heat for a lengthy period of time. The long, slow cooking develops flavor and tenderizes foods by gently breaking down their fibers. Braising can be done on top of the range or in the oven. A tight-fitting lid is very important to prevent the liquid from evaporating.
    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    The key to a tasty braised dish is the browning of the meat before the lengthy cooking process. The protein can be braising at a temperature as low as 225 degrees. The lower the temperature the longer the cooking time. This is true for all cuts of meat and all species of animal. The meat should be tender and almost falling apart when finished cooking.

  • Roasting

    ROASTING: Roasting is a dry cooking method and means to oven-cook food in an uncovered pan, a method that usually produces a well-browned exterior and ideally a moist interior. Roasting requires reasonably tender pieces of meat or poultry.

    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    Beef: Beef should be roasted uncovered and can be seasoned appropriately. It can be cooked to various degrees of doneness ranging from 130 degrees to 180 degrees depending on the cut and tastes of the consumer. Beef can be roasted at an oven temperature of 250 degrees – 350 degrees depending on the cut.

    Poultry: All Poultry should be roasted to a final temperature of 180 degrees and can be seasoned prior to roasting. For a crispier skin some people will dry off the skin and let it sit out for a few minutes to air dry before placing it in the oven. Poultry can be roasted at an oven temperature of 250 degrees – 350 degrees.
    Pork: Pork should be roasted to a final temperature of 145 for medium to 170 degrees for well done. Pork can be seasoned lightly or with a rub. It can be marinated or even coated with a crust of bread crumbs. Pork can be roasted at an oven temperature of 250 degrees – 350 degrees.

  • Grilling

    GRILLING: Is a dry cooking method and means to prepare food on a grill over hot coals or another heat source. The term barbecue is often used synonymously with grill.

    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    Beef: Beef to be grilled should be seasoned prior to cooking. It can be marinated, coated with a rub or simply seasoned with salt and pepper depending on the cut. When grilling beef the doneness can range from 135 degrees for rare to 170 degrees for well done. Dry seasoned steaks should be grilled on a medium-high to high heat. Beef that is to be basted with a sauce or that is a tougher cut should be grilled low and slow.

    Poultry: Poultry should be seasoned prior to grilling. It can be marinated, coated with a rub or simply seasoned with salt and pepper. When grilling poultry it should be cooked to a final temperature of 180 degrees for well done. Poultry is best grilled on a low to medium heat because of the fat content in the skin.

    Pork: Pork should be grilled to a final temperature of 145 for medium to 170 degrees for well done. Pork can be seasoned lightly, marinated or coated with a rub. Pork can be grilled on a medium to high heat.

  • Broiling

    BROILING: Is a dry cooking method and refers to cooking food directly under or above the heat source. Food can be broiled in an oven, directly under the gas or electric heat source, or on a barbecue grill, directly over charcoal or other heat source.
    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    Beef: Beef to be broiled should be seasoned prior to cooking. It can be marinated, coated with a rub or simply seasoned with salt and pepper depending on the cut. When broiling beef the doneness can range from 135 degrees for rare to 170 degrees for well done. Dry seasoned steaks should be broiled on a medium-high to high heat. Beef that is to be basted with a sauce or that is a tougher cut should be broiled low and slow.

    Poultry: Poultry should be seasoned prior to broiling. It can be marinated, coated with a rub or simply seasoned with salt and pepper. When broiling poultry it should be cooked to a final temperature of 180 degrees for well done. Poultry is best broiled on a low to medium heat because of the fat content in the skin. Poultry that is to be basted with a sauce should be broiled low and slow.

    Pork: Pork should be broiled to a final temperature of 145 for medium to 170 degrees for well done. Pork can be seasoned lightly, marinated or coated with a rub. Pork can be broiled on a medium to high heat. Pork that is to be basted with a sauce or that is a tougher cut should be broiled low and slow.

  • Frying

    FRYING: To cook food in hot fat over moderate to high heat. Deep fried food is submerged in hot, liquid fat.
    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    When frying protein of any kind it is typically breaded or battered to protect the outer edges of the meat and to retain juiciness. It is usually fried till well done in most cases. One exception to frying protein without a coating would be fondue in which case final cooking temperatures would be in effect to achieve proper doneness. Beef 130 degrees-170 degrees. Poultry 180 degrees. Pork 145 degrees-170 degrees.

  • Sauteing

    SAUTEING: refers to cooking food in a lesser amount of fat than frying, which doesn’t cover the food. There is little difference in these two terms, though sautéing is often thought of as using less fat than frying and being the faster of the two methods
    For best results: Remember that your protein will continue to cook after it is removed from the direct heat and will rise in temperature 10-15 degrees depending on the size of the meat.

    Beef: Beef to be sautéed should be seasoned prior to cooking. It can be marinated or simply seasoned with salt and pepper. When sautéing beef the doneness can range from 135 degrees for rare to 170 degrees for well done.

    Poultry: Poultry should be seasoned prior to sautéing. It can be marinated or simply seasoned with salt and pepper. When sautéing poultry it should be cooked to a final temperature of 180 degrees for well done.

    Pork: Pork should be sautéed to a final temperature of 145 for medium to 170 degrees for well done. Pork can be seasoned lightly or marinated.

  • Beef Marinating Times

    Primal

    Cuts

    Marinating Time

    Chuck (Steaks)

    Chuck Arm Steak, Chuck Eye Steak, Mock Tender Steak,   Chuck Shoulder Steak, Top Blade Steak

    4 to 6 hours

    Chuck (Roasts)

    7-Bone Roast, Arm Roast, Chuck-Eye Roast, Cross Rib   Roast, Shoulder Pot Roast

    8 to 10 hours

    Rib (Steaks)

    Rib-Eye Steak, Rib Steak

    30 minutes to 1 hour

    Rib (Roasts)

    Rib Roasts, Rib-Eye Roast

    1 to 2 hours

    Short Loin (Steaks)

    T-Bone Steak, Tenderloin Steak, Top Loin Steak

    30 minutes to 1 hour

    Short Loin (Roast)

    Tenderloin Roast

    1 to 2 hours

    Sirloin (Steak)

    Sirloin Steak, Tri-Tip Steak

    2 to 4 hours

    Sirloin (Roast)

    Tri-Tip Roast

    4 to 6 hours

    Round (Steak)

    Round Steak, Round Tip Steak

    4 to 6 hours

    Round (Roast)

    Bottom Round Roast, Eye Round Roast, Round Tip Roast,   Rump Roast, Tip Roast

    8 to 10 hours

    Plate (Steak)

    Hanger Steak, Skirt Steak

    4 to 6 hours

    Flank (Steak)

    Flank Steak

    4 to 6 hours

    Brisket

    Trimmed

    10 to 12 hours

    Brisket

    Untrimmed

    16 t0 18 hours

     

  • Resting Meat

    One of the key factors in preserving the juiciness of a freshly cooked piece of protein is to let it rest before cutting into it.  Resting can vary from 5 minutes to 15 minutes depending on the size of the protein you are cooking.

Page 1 of 212